Whistle While You Work (For Nothing): Positive Affect as Coercive Strategy – The Case of Workfare

In this post, Lynne Friedli and Robert Stearn look at the role of  psychological coercion, notably through the imposition of positive affect,  in UK Government workfare programmes. There has been little or no debate about the recruitment of psychology/psychologists into monitoring,  modifying and/or punishing  people who claim social security benefits. This Read more…

Exhaustion (One day workshop, University of Kent, Friday 25 October 2013)

Exhaustion Friday, 25 October, Cathedral Lodge, Canterbury Funded by the Wellcome Trust Organised by Anna Katharina Schaffner This interdisciplinary conference explores different medical, psychological and socio-political narratives on the origins of and cures for exhaustion. Experts from diverse disciplines (including psychiatrists, psychologists, social scientists, occupational health specialists, literary scholars and Read more…

“It’s a Pain Series”: “Every Move you Make” – The Normal Psychology of Chronic Pain” (Lecture, Stockton, 6 December 2012)

“It’s a Pain Series” 6th December 2012, Stockton Arts Centre, 7.00-8.15pm Free entry and no booking required ‘EVERY MOVE YOU MAKE’- THE NORMAL PSYCHOLOGY OF CHRONIC PAIN Professor Stephen Morley, University of Leeds What’s this lecture about? What has psychology got to do with pain?  I suspect that psychology is associated Read more…

Industriousness and Daydreaming: Cognitive Neuroscience’s Revaluation of Rest – Felicity Callard (Seminar, Glasgow, November 2 2012)

Industriousness and Daydreaming: Cognitive Neuroscience’s Revaluation of Rest Dr Felicity Callard Senior Lecturer in Social Science for Medical Humanities, Durham University Friday 2nd of November, 3:30pm East Quadrangle Lecture Theatre, University of Glasgow Wine Reception to follow Abstract: How might human geography respond to the epistemological and ontological challenges posed Read more…

Experimental entanglements in cognitive neuroscience (Workshop, Berlin, 25-26 October 2012)

The CMH blog post “Medical humanities and cognitive neuroscience: trandisciplinary openings and endeavours” explored how several people at/associated with the Centre for Medical Humanities at Durham (CMH) are interested in grappling with how the medical humanities as a domain can productively engage not only with the interpretation of science that is being pursued Read more…