‘Recovery’ in mental health: who judges, on what grounds, with what evidence, and which arguments?

The medical humanities have contributed greatly to research that addresses – conceptually, historically and empirically – whose perspective(s) are (and should be) privileged when judging the contours of illness and health. One research arena in which these questions currently have particular salience and urgency is that of research on ‘recovery’ Read more…

The letter to the scientific/medical editor: a neglected genre within medical humanities?

This month’s (August’s) edition of the British Journal of Psychiatry features an editorial entitled, “Antipsychotics: is it time to introduce patient choice?”.  The authors (Anthony P Morrison, Paul Hutton, David Shiers and Douglas Turkington) make an important and provocative argument (given the journal in which their editorial appears – which is not Read more…

Narrative, self-understanding and the regulation of emotion in psychiatric disorder (Conference, London, Oct 12-13 2012)

Institute of Philosophy, School of Advanced Study, University of London  Many if not most psychiatric disorders are characterised by an inability to regulate, tolerate, or respond appropriately to feelings. Often patients with these problems will give an account of their affective states and motives which takes the form of a Read more…

Culture, Mind, and Brain: Emerging Concepts, Methods, Applications (Conference, UCLA, October 2012)

5th FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference Culture, Mind, and Brain: Emerging Concepts, Methods, Applications October 19–20, 2012 UCLA Many lines of research on culture, mind, and brain can no longer be neatly separated. Some questions run together, thanks to our growing understanding of the genome, the biological roots of human sociality, and Read more…