Journal of Applied Arts and Health

‘Developing guidelines for good practice in participatory arts-in-health-care contexts’, by Mike White, has just been published in the Journal of Applied Arts and Health.

ABSTRACT: As the field of arts in health grows in scale and diversity, it needs to affirm a set of shared principles and describe what constitutes best practice. This article recounts the production of guidelines for good practice in participatory arts in healthcare, based on consultations with practitioners in the arts and health sectors in Ireland in 2008-09. It considers why it was difficult and inappropriate to formalise a code of practice but explains how guidelines for good practice within an ethical framework were collectively agreed.  It argues that the arts in health practitioner is not the individual artist but rather a partnership between diverse professional interests  with common principles and values that govern engagement with participants and inform the planning, delivery and evaluation of the practice.  It considers issues of quality and risk and proposes that benchmarking best practice should be the next step.

CITATION: White, M. (2010), ‘Developing guidelines for good practice in participatory arts-in-health-care contexts’, Journal of Applied Arts and Health 1: 2, pp. 139–155


1 Comment

Monex · February 9, 2011 at 1:58 am

New guidelines for those involved in participatory arts programmes in a healthcare setting are now available. The guidelines Participatory Arts Practice in Healthcare Contexts – Guidelines for Good Practice were commissioned by Waterford Healing Arts Trust WHAT and the HSE South Cork Arts and Health Programme with financial support from Arts Council Ireland… Having identified the need for such a resource Mike White Senior Research Fellow in Arts Health and Mary Robson Associate for Arts in Health and Education at the Centre for Medical Humanities CMH at Durham University were engaged to develop the guidelines.

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