This week the Centre for Medical Humanities is participating in two important conferences: the 14th International Medical Geography Symposium (Durham University) and the 8th Annual Association for Medical Humanities Conference (University of Leicester). Reviews and reflections will be posted on the blog over the coming days, but meanwhile here is a preview of the two specially convened ‘Geographies of Health and Humanities’ sessions on today:

Geographies of Health and Humanities 1: Creativity, the Arts and Well-being
Convenors: Sarah Atkinson & Hester Parr, Chair: Ronan Foley

  • Bethan Evans & Angela Woods, “On the Radical Potential of Arts in Health”
  • Kate Hampshire & Mathilde Matthijsse, “Can Arts Projects Improve Young People’s Wellbeing? A Social Capital Approach
  • Sarah Atkinson & Karen Scott, “Dancing the Curriculum: Reconfiguring Spaces, Literacies and Wellbeings”
  • Hester Parr & Geraldine Perriam, “Writing Geographies for Well-Being and Recovery: The Impact of the Creative Writing of Place and Landscape for People with Mental Health Problems”
  • Mike White & Mary Robson, “Arts in Health and Collective Engagements

Geographies of Health and Humanities 2: Energies, Health and Well-being
Convenors: Ronan Foley & Chris Philo, Chair: Sarah Atkinson

  • Martyn Evans, “Wonder, Treatment and the Energy of Imagination”
  • Ronan Foley, “Indigenous Narratives of Health: (Re)Placing Folk-Medicine within Health Histories”
  • Chris Philo, Louisa Cadman & Jen Lea, “New Urban Spiritualities: The Energies of Yoga and Meditation”
  • David Conradson, “Inhabiting the World in New Ways: Mindfulness, Affect and Well-Being”
  • Geraldine Perriam, “Healing Places, Sacred Spaces, Then and Now”

Abstracts and further details appear the IMGS programme, available as a PDF download.


1 Comment

Human Geography in the United Kingdom & Its Growing Links with Medical Humanities | Centre for Medical Humanities Blog · March 6, 2013 at 1:08 pm

[…] been most engaged (see our posts here and details of international conference sessions organised here), was singled out for special […]

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